Maritime Museum

Maritime Museum

Ireland’s National Maritime Museum is housed in Dun Laoghaire’s 180-year-old Mariners Church, directly opposite the new DLR Lexicon library and easily accessible by DART suburban train and several bus services. The museum’s greatest artefact is probably the building itself as it is one of a few custom built places of worship for seafarers remaining intact in the world to-day.

The James Joyce Tower & Museum

The James Joyce Tower & Museum

The James Joyce Tower & Museum is situated only 30 minutes from Dublin City Centre. Open daily with free admission. Embrace the literature of James Joyce within this iconic museum at the Martello Tower, Sandycove, Co. Dublin.

The dlr LexIcon

The dlr LexIcon

dlr LexIcon The dlr LexIcon, the new Central Library and Cultural Centre opened in 2015. With 80,000 items in the adult and junior libraries, 60+ computers, 100 study spaces and a floor dedicated to Local Studies, there is plenty to discover at dlr LexIcon.

Dalkey Castle & Heritage Centre

Dalkey Castle & Heritage Centre

Ten miles south of Dublin City, Dalkey is famed as a coastal village jam-packed with restaurants, culture and seaside walks. It’s got heritage too. Dalkey Island bears the picturesque ruins of St. Beignet’s Church, and archaeologists have traced artefacts like arrowheads, axes and pottery back to the Stone Age (boat trips can be booked locally for the short crossing). In the village itself, Dalkey Castle and Heritage Centre bundles a townhouse, 15th century castle, Early Christian church and heritage centre in one tidy campus. Guided tours include a live theatre performance with costumed actors bringing the past to life.

hurdygurdyradiomuseum

hurdygurdyradiomuseum

The Martello tower stands on the site of a former motte castle of the St. Lawrence Estate. It is also said to have been the site of the original Howth Castle. The museum gets its name from a comment made by the late Seán Lemass (former Taoiseach) while visiting the radio studios of Radio Éireann in Dublin. He referred to the radio service as “the old hurdy-gurdy” as whilst on his visit to the studios the RTÉ Concert Orchestra (then known as the Radio Éireann Light Orchestra) was tuning up… and the sound was reminiscent of a ‘hurdy-gurdy’. The museum first opened in 2003, Pat Herbert, the curator, had been looking for a suitable premises to display his vast collection of radios, gramophones and other radio-related paraphernalia. Fingal County Council offered the recently refurbished Martello Tower to Pat for use as a museum. Pat maintains the museum as a labour of love. It is not run as a commercial enterprise. He enthusiastically gives of his time voluntarily, purely for the pleasure and enjoyment he derives from it. He is joined in his efforts by a team of volunteers, who all provide tours and introductions to the collection.